Exploring Albany's inglorious past and dubious future

Dorothy Dreslin’s Moment In The Sun

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Albany girl Dorothy Dreslin sang with local dance bands in the early 1930’s.

By 1935, she had feature shows on WGY and WABY. In 1936 she was featured vocalist on a Brunswick record with with Dick McDonough & His Orchestra (hear it by clicking on the link beneath the record label).

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Dorothy Dreslin sings “Stars In My Eyes”

The next year, she was hired by the NBC Radio Network as a staff artist, and given a spotlight on the weekly “Hammerstein’s Music Hall” program. 1937-1938 were the high water mark of her radio career.

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Executives from Warner Brothers heard Miss Dreslin on her NBC Magic Melodies program, and met with her to discuss a series of motion picture shorts. Unfortunately, nothing came of this.

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I couldn’t find any information on the soprano’s doings in the wartime years, but I assume she remained active in radio entertainment.

Dreslin returned to Albany in 1945, and was soon hired to manage the record department at Arnoldy Music.dreslin5

In 1950, Dorothy Dreslin opened a vocal training studio which she operated for over two decades, coaching many “Teen Age Barn” regulars.dreslin6

The trail runs cold there. I couldn’t find an obituary. Any more information would be much appreciated.dreslin7

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2 Responses to “Dorothy Dreslin’s Moment In The Sun”

  1. Patrick Olesko

    I studied voice with Dorothy Dreslin in the early seventies. She would occasionally bring out shoeboxes of fan letters and read them aloud. There was also a parakeet that had the freedom of flight in her apartment. She was an excellent teacher. A friend of my parents from Normanside country club, she’d come to the house for parties. She passed from a heat attack in her apartment while watching Nixon deliver a speech. Jap915@hotmail.com.

    Reply
  2. Paul Lindemeyer

    Dorothy is featured on a 12″ Victor record medley “Sigmund Romberg Presents ‘Forbidden Melody,'” conducted by Leonard Joy in 1936. This is a rare record, as the show was a turkey (good music tho), and may have been a promotional piece not for public sale.

    Reply

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